D ECONOMY: ECONOMIC INDICATORS (as of March 2015)

UNEMPLOYMENT RATES DECREASE


Source: Texas Workforce Commission; Preliminary values, not seasonally adjusted.

CITY OF DALLAS LABOR FORCE AND EMPLOYMENT (PERSONS)


Source: Texas Workforce Commission; Preliminary values, not seasonally adjusted.

 

CITY OF DALLAS UNEMPLOYMENT RATE


Source: Texas Workforce Commission; Preliminary values, not seasonally adjusted.

        • The preliminary unemployment rate for the City of Dallas for February 2015 decreased by 0.3 percentage points to 4.3 percent.
        • The rate’s change was the result of a decrease in the net number of unemployed with only a slight decrease in the city’s labor force. The slight decrease in the city’s labor force can in part be contributed to seasonal labor factors.

 

CITY OF DALLAS HOUSEHOLD EMPLOYMENT


Source: Texas Workforce Commission; Preliminary values not seasonally adjusted.

              • The preliminary February 2015 count of employed Dallas residents decreased by 0.1% to 613,897.
              • This is a 536-worker decrease from the previous month’s revised resident employment level of 614,433.

 

CITY OF DALLAS STOCK INDEX

Source: Wharton Research Data Services, 2015.

    • The City of Dallas Stock Index tracks the collective value of all publicly traded companies headquartered within the City of Dallas. Companies in the index are weighted according to the total market value of their outstanding shares
    • The City of Dallas Stock Index is updated quarterly based on corporate SEC filing data, and indexed to the first quarter of 1996.

 

 

PAYCHEX | IHS SMALL BUSINESS JOBS INDEX BY MSA


Source:  Paychex Inc., March 2015. http://www.paychex.com/jobs-index/

                      • The Paychex | IHS Small Business Jobs Index provides an up-to-date measurement of the change in small business employment over the last 12 months. An upward trend represented by a index value greater than 100 indicates a strengthening small business job market, while a downward trend represented by an index value less than 100 represents a slowdown in small business hiring.
                      • The data used for this index comes from a selection of 350,000 small businesses with less than 50 employees in the U.S.
                      • Dallas has led all indexed metro areas in the nation by this measurement of small business job growth since October 2014.

2014 ANNUAL C2ER COST OF LIVING INDEX


Source:  Council for Community and Economic Research, 2015. http://www.coli.org/

                      • The Council for Community and Economic Research publishes an annual Cost of Living Index to provide an accurate measure to compare cost of living differences among urban areas. Items on which the index is based have been chosen to reflect different categories of consumer expenditures.
                      • The Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex has the lowest cost of living index score of the ten largest metropolitan areas of the United States.

UPDATED FEBRUARY 2015: DALLAS-FORT WORTH CMSA CONSUMER PRICE INDEX

Source: US Bureau of Labor Statistics, February 2015; Preliminary values not seasonally adjusted.

                      • The Consumer Price Index is a weighted average price index for consumer goods and services. Its percentage change represents inflation.
                      • The Dallas-Fort Worth consumer price index declined by 1.05 percent from November 2014 to January 2015.
                      • Over the same time period the U.S. consumer price index declined by 1.04 percent.
                      • The Dallas-Fort Worth core index (price growth less food and energy) increased 0.27 percent over the two-month time period, while the U.S core index was unchanged.
                      • In general, consumer price growth remains muted due to weakness in the global economy. While geopolitical events still pose a threat, inflationary pressures, especially in crude oil, continue to decline.

2014 MEDIAN SALE PRICE OF EXISTING SINGLE-FAMILY HOMES


Source: NAR, February 2015. http://www.realtor.org/topics/metropolitan-median-area-prices-and-affordability/data

                      • The National Association of Realtors Quarterly Metropolitan Median Area Prices and Affordability Report provides a measure of the median selling prices for existing single-family homes and condos by metropolitan area.
                      • The majority of metropolitan areas in the United States experienced stronger price growth in the fourth quarter of 2014, resulting from a decline in housing supply and an uptick in demand fueled by lower interest rates and a stronger job market.
                      • Home prices in metropolitan areas throughout the United States continue to show solid price growth, up 25 percent over the past three years on average. The median sales price of existing single-family homes in the Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area has increase by an estimated 9.0% over the last 4 quarters.

UPDATED NOVEMBER 2014: ECONOMIC GROWTH WIDESPREAD ACROSS METROPOLITAN AREAS IN 2013

Source: US Bureau of Economic Analysis, September 2014

                          • Real GDP increased in 292 of the nation’s 381 metropolitan areas in 2013.
                          • The Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington MSA ranked 6th in the nation in level of real GDP, with a 2013 growth rate of 2.1%.
                          • Sectors contributing most to the 2.1% GDP increase in the Dallas-Fort Worth MSA were trade (0.52%), education and healthcare (0.19%), and information (0.18%).